These are the travel restrictions for every state and territory after the Sydney COVID outbreak escalated – ABC News

These are the travel restrictions for every state and territory after the Sydney COVID outbreak escalated – ABC News

These are the travel restrictions for every state and territory after the Sydney COVID outbreak escalated – ABC News

Community cases of COVID-19 have been detected in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland, so travel restrictions are changing almost every day ahead of the imminent school holidays. 
If you've planned to travel interstate in the coming weeks, we've compiled a list of the latest restrictions.
Remember:
With that in mind, here's a breakdown of the COVID restrictions for each state and where residents can travel.
Click a link below to jump to the state or territory relevant to you.
The New South Wales winter school holidays are from Saturday, June 26 to Sunday, July 11.
The Greater Sydney, Blue Mountains, Central Coast and Wollongong regions will enter lockdown from 6:00pm Saturday, June 26 until Friday, July 9.
Under the lockdown, people in the above regions can only leave home for:
Anyone visiting regional NSW (that is not listed above) will be required to adhere to restrictions including:
Many states and territories have advised their residents against travelling to NSW, given the chance for further spread of COVID-19 in the state. 
NSW currently requires travellers who have been in Victoria in the previous 14 days to complete a NSW entry declaration form.
Travellers who have been in Victoria at a close contact or casual contact venue must follow testing and self-isolation requirements.
Anyone who lives or works in the below local areas has been told not to leave Greater Sydney except for essential reasons:
Other states and territories have placed significant restrictions on the movement of people from Greater Sydney and its surrounds.
The restrictions for each state and territory are listed in the relevant sections of this article.
The Victorian winter school holidays are from Saturday, June 26 to Sunday, July 11.
All travellers to Victoria, who do not have an exemption, must apply for a Victorian Travel Permit before entering the state.
The permit system works on a traffic light system, with areas designated as green, orange or red zones depending on COVID outbreaks.
A map showing the zones across Australia and New Zealand can be found on the Victorian Government's website.
Greater Sydney, including Central Coast, Shellharbour, Blue Mountains and Wollongong regions are currently classified as red zones, meaning non-Victorian travellers will not be allowed to enter without an exemption.
Victorian residents who need to return home can apply for an exemption but will have to quarantine on arrival.
Queensland lifted its travel restrictions on people travelling from Victoria at 1:00am on Friday, June 25. 
South Australia is also reopened its border to travellers from Greater Melbourne on Friday.
The Queensland winter school holidays are from Saturday, June 26 to Sunday, July 11.
Queensland has closed its border to Greater Sydney, the Central Coast, the Blue Mountains, Wollongong and Shellharbour. People who have been in those areas who are not Queensland residents will not be allowed to enter. Queensland residents who have been in these areas will be required to go into hotel quarantine. 
Anyone entering Queensland who has not been to a COVID-19 hotspot must complete a travel declaration form up to three days prior to arrival.
Anyone entering Queensland who has been to a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days, or since the date it was identified, must complete a border pass form three days before arrival.
Travel restrictions imposed on Greater Melbourne were lifted at 1:00am on Friday morning.
You can find a list of current COVID-19 hotspots here.
Queensland currently has two active community cases, after a woman was apparently infected with COVID-19 in hotel quarantine and passed it on at a family centre.
Anyone who has been to an exposure site is required to follow health advice, but there are no broad restrictions on entries to other parts of the country from Queensland.
The ACT winter school holidays are from Saturday, June 26 to Sunday, July 11.
The ACT has closed its border to all of metropolitan Sydney, excluding the Central Coast, Blue Mountains, Wollongong and Shellharbour.
Non-residents who have been in metropolitan Sydney will not be allowed to enter without an exemption.
Returning ACT residents will be required to follow stay-at-home orders.
Non-residents who have been at close contact locations in Queensland or Victoria are not permitted to enter without an exemption. Residents are required to self-isolate for 14 days from the time of exposure.
For people who have been to casual contact locations, all entries into the ACT must get a COVID-19 test and isolate until a negative result is returned.
There are currently no restrictions in place for people wanting to enter most parts of the country from the ACT.
However, ACT Health says people should not travel between the ACT and Greater Sydney.
The Northern Territory winter school holidays are from Saturday, June 26 to Monday, July 19 (students return on the Tuesday).
The NT is open to most parts of Australia, but has declared five LGAs in New South Wales as hotspots.
Arrivals from Greater Sydney, the Blue Mountains, Wollongong, Waverley and Woollahra will be forced into mandatory quarantine at their own cost.
As with other states and territories, the NT also has restrictions in place for people who have been to exposure sites in Victoria, NSW, the ACT and Queensland.
There are currently no restrictions in place on people from the NT visiting other parts of the country.
However, Territorians with plans to visit the above hotspots have been told to cancel their plans.
A positive case was detected on Friday, June 25, in a mine, with 900 FIFO workers now isolating
The Western Australia winter school holidays are from Saturday, July 3 to Sunday, July 18.
WA has imposed a hard border for travellers who have been in NSW since Friday, June 11 or in the 14 days prior to travel.
Travellers from Victoria are required to quarantine for 14 days either at home or in a hotel.
People arriving from the rest of the country need to follow public health advice around exposure sites.
There are currently no restrictions on people from WA travelling to other parts of the country, however, Premier Mark McGowan has warned restrictions for NSW could become stricter.
The South Australian winter school holidays are from Saturday, July 3 to Sunday, July 18.
South Australia has closed its border to any non-resident who has been in New South Wales in the past 14 days.
That excludes a 100km buffer zone that allows border communities to continue crossing the border. 
South Australians returning home, essential workers, people moving to South Australia permanently and people fleeing domestic violence will still be allowed to enter the state.
All travellers to South Australia must complete the Cross Border Travel Registration form at least seven days before arriving.
A separate registration form must be completed for every person, including children.
South Australia reopened its border to travellers from Greater Melbourne from 12:01am on Friday, June 25.
There are currently no restrictions for travellers leaving South Australia.
The Tasmanian winter school holidays are from Saturday, July 3 to Monday, July 19.
From 4:00pm Saturday, Tasmania closed its border to any travellers from the Greater Sydney, Wollongong, Central Coast and Blue Mountains local government areas.
Anyone who has been in those areas since June 21 should self-isolate immediately and get a COVID-19 test.
The current risk status of each state and territory can be found on the Tasmanian government’s coronavirus website.
There are currently no restrictions for travellers leaving Tasmania.
See our full coverage of coronavirus
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