Ten elegant living rooms featuring Japandi interior design – Dezeen

Ten elegant living rooms featuring Japandi interior design – Dezeen

Ten elegant living rooms featuring Japandi interior design – Dezeen

The minimalist styles and natural materials used in both Japan and Scandinavia come together in this lookbook, containing 10 living rooms that have been decorated with Japandi interior design.
“Japandi” has become the denomination for interiors where Japanese minimalism meets Scandinavian functionality. Simple, pared-back designs and natural materials are some of the key characteristics of the style.
Bare branches and dried flowers add an organic touch to the interiors, which also tend to feature an abundance of wood – a material used in both Japanese and Scandinavian interiors.
This is the latest lookbook in a series providing visual inspiration for interior designers and design lovers. Previous lookbooks in the series have showcased plant-filled offices, calm living rooms and interiors made from biomaterials.
Montreal House, Canada, by Talo Studio
A historic Montreal house was given a contemporary update by design studio Talo Studio, which played with textures to create the home’s minimalist aesthetic.
“A thick rounded sofa is combined with a low linear slatted coffee table and nubby rug with a subtle swirl, reminiscent of a Japanese garden,” studio founder Tiina Vahtola told Dezeen.
An angular Hans Wegner lounge chair with a sheepskin throw nods to the Scandinavian influence.
Find out more about Montreal House ›
The Audo, Denmark, by Norm Architects and Menu
Danish design brand Menu and architecture studio Norm Architects collaborated on the design of The Audo, a hotel in Copenhagen’s Nordhavn area.
A coffee table in veiny Carrara marble adds pattern interest to the room’s muted design, while a woven rug and rock-like ceramic sculpture stand out against the bare walls. The room’s beige sofa with a wooden frame evokes functional Japanese furniture.
Find out more about The Audo ›
Biscuit Loft apartment, USA, by OWIU Studio
Japanese design elements were added to this industrial loft space in Brooklyn, New York, such as a raised platform that can double as a bed frame. In the living room, a classic white Eames lounge chair sits next to a sculptural side table in dark wood.
Dried flowers and grass and a selection of ceramic jugs and vases make for a living room design that feels more Scandinavian or Japanese than American. A traditional Scandinavian-style tasseled rug makes the room feel more homely.
Find out more about Biscuit Loft apartment ›
Powerscroft Road, UK, by Daytrip
This London home combines a pared-down interior design with interesting tactile touches such as a fluffy rug with a geometric pattern.
A rough-hewn wooden side table is reminiscent of traditional Japanese joinery, while the vintage Cleopatra daybed by Dutch designer Dick Cordemeyer for Auping adds a northern European design piece that perfectly matches the home’s Asian influences.
Find out more about Powerscroft Road ›
Azabu Residence, Japan, by Norm Architects and Keiji Ashizawa Design
Norm Architects and Keiji Ashizawa Design have collaborated on a number of projects, including this Japandi interior design for a home in Tokyo.
The triangular pendant lamp is by Norm Architects for Karimoku Case Study and is made from traditional Japanese washi paper. Its geometric shape is picked up by the abstract sculptures on one of the walls and complements the armless modular sofa.
Find out more about Azabu Residence ›
Margin House, Japan, by Kohei Yukawa
Margin House was designed by architect Kohei Yukawa for himself and his family. Flexible living spaces are arranged around an atrium that features a living tree in the middle of the room.
The use of pale wood throughout adds a Scandinavian touch to the room, which has a welcoming feel and is flooded with natural light.
Find out more about Margin House ›
Ca l’Amo, Spain, by Marià Castelló
Architecture studio Marià Castelló designed this retreat in Ibiza using cross-laminated timber (CLT) to keep the volumes lightweight.
The delicate feel of the architecture with its wooden detailing is echoed in the furniture and decorations chosen for the interior, including a classic Pierre Paulin Butterfly Chair.
Slender tree branches are used for decoration, mirroring the trees in the building’s courtyard.
Find out more about Ca l’Amo ›
Kinuta Terrace, Japan by Keiji Ashizawa Design and Norm Architects
The Kinuta Terrace in Tokyo has a muted, discrete colour palette of beige walls and curtains that match the wooden floor in the living room. Here, a grey stone table with a wooden frame complements a wooden sofa with grey cushions.
A decorative vases and round sculptures on the table mirror a large pot that holds a money tree (Pachira aquatica).
Find out more about Kinuta Terrace ›
Edinburgh apartment, Scotland, by Luke McClelland Design
A British take on Japandi interior design can be seen in this living room in an apartment in Edinburgh. Simple and functional, the design nonetheless feels interesting because of the small touches, such as the dark-wood foldable side table and the classic rice lamp.
Artworks decorate the walls and the room’s fireplace has been painted black, matching the graphic slender black floor lamps. The wooden floor has been left mostly bare, with just a small grey rug for decoration.
Find out more about Edinburgh apartment ›
A Quiet Reflection, Sweden, by Ariake
Japanese furniture producer Ariake created an installation at Stockholm Design Week in 2018 to show its first collection. The range included these wooden sofas, whose strict lines and warm wooden frames perfectly encompass the meeting between Scandinavian and Japanese style.
A triangular white lamp and small sculptural side table are a fun addition to the room, which also features a weathered wooden floor and walls where the peeling paint has become a decorative feature in itself.
Find out more about A Quiet Reflection ›
This is the latest lookbook in a series providing visual inspiration for interior designers and design lovers. Previous lookbooks in the series have showcased plant-filled offices, calm living rooms and interiors made from biomaterials.
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